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until the fiscal cliff and if democrats and republicans don't start talking to each other, everybody's taxes will be going up january 1. as emily schmidt reports, a lot's happening not at the negotiating table, it's happening at the sunday talk shows. it's been 16 days since president obama and congressional leaders gathered to talk about how to avoid the fiscal cliff, the automatic spending cuts and tax increases that go into effect january 1. >> i think we're farther apart but we're coming together. >> i think we're nowhere, period. >> thursday treasury secretary tim geithner presented obama's plan, including $1.4 trillion in tax increases. >> there's not going to be an agreement without rates going up. >> president obama also proposed a $16 billion of spending cuts. >> i'm just flabbergasted. i looked at him and said you can't be serious. >> the house speaker says republicans put increased revenues including efforts to close tax loopholes and put the tax cuts on the table instead of raising tax rates for anyone. >> if there's another way to get income from upper income americans t
closer to the fiscal cliff i think many republicans will realize it is an indefensible position to go back to their districts and say to 100% of their constituents, your taxes are going to go up because i was protecting 2%. >> okay. let me ask you about your party because one question is why is it so important to you, to the president, to other democrats that rates go up on the 2%, the wealthiest americans, because i know there are a lot of issues at play here, but it seems as though your side will not go anywhere until you get that. is that correct? >> no, look, what's important to me and to my party is that we reduce our debt. what's important is that we reduce our debt, but not on the backs of middle class and seniors. what's important is that we have debt reduction that is big, bold and balanced. to do that, you have to cut spending. we have already voted for $2 trillion in cuts. >> you won't budge on that 2%. i just want to make crystal clear that's the deal. >> we can negotiate. i'm all for talking and reasonable compromise, but it doesn't look like we're going to be able to get
administration is fully prepared to go off that fiscal cliff if republicans don't agree to tax hikes on the wealthiest americans. let's bring in congressional correspondent kate bolduan. the white house won't budge on taxes. the republican led house takes a break. can you make sense of this for us? >> i think that's a little above any of our pay grade trying to make sense of it all other than it seems that it's one more fight that we've seen over and over again and we are seeing once again it play out almost as it appears slow motion, carol. you mention the call between speaker boehner and president obama. they may have talked. no read out of the call per se. we are still a long way away from a deal that is for sure. why? because at its most basic neither side is giving on their primary position. president obama continues to insist over and over again any deal must include a tax rate increase on the top 2% of wage earners which republicans just as firmly insist is a nonstarter. today the president is going to continue his public pressure campaign according to the white house, he's me
with house republicans who are angry at his new pitch to raise 8$800 million in fiscal cliff negotiations. we're expecting a news conference any minute now on that meeting. we'll bring it to you live. nancy pelosi spoke about it a few hours ago. here's what she had to say. >> i would hope that that would break the fall on the cliff, which is becoming more of a soil if they do that but really, we do need to put a down payment, not just in revenues which passing middle income tax cut means the end of holding them hostage. >> senior congressional correspondent dana bash is on capitol hill. so what's happening now? >> reporter: well, we have been talking to republican lawmakers as they have been coming out of this meeting that the house republican conference had this morning and i should tell you any moment we're going to see the speaker and the other members of the leadership. i'll sit down when that happens. but what we've actually heard is what went on behind closed doors is not the backlash from conservatives outside the congress but certainly groups that are very, very upset that the house r
party. you're a republican, he's democrat. 30 days and counting until we go over the fiscal cliff unless congress in the white house cuts a deal to avoid tax cuts. it sounds like two groups of people are looking at two different sets of numbers. take a look. >> we prefer to do upfront alongside a deal that includes raising rates on americans. we are prepared to do a meaningful amount of spending on the saving side, not just to avoid the damage of the sequester but to help reduce our long-term deficit. >> i was disappointed by the president's proposal. i think it is essentially a rerun of his budget proposal. the revenue proposals are $1.6 trillion in revenue and tax increases. it's a massive tax increase. but also not significant and meaningful in entitlement reforms. >> so, anna, i hear comments like those and remarks by john boehner and the president of the united states and i wonder after the election, did we learn anything? because i -- my reading on the election was that the people, the voters wanted compromise. and for the people in washington to talk to each other not at each othe
counterproposal on avoiding that fiscal cliff. the republican plan totals $2.2 trillion in deficit reduction over ten years. now, the part that stood out to us was the $600 billion in proposed savings in medicare reforms in part by raising he will he wieligibility from 65 t. dn pfeifer says it provides to details on which deductions they would eliminate, which loopholes they will chose, or which medicare savings they would would achieve. jason is the chief political correspondent at politics 365 and john bray bend ser a republican political consul can't and former senior strategist. welcome to you both. >> good morning. >> good morning. >> so i keep wondering, you know, why are the two parties negotiating in public? wouldn't it be better if they negotiated behind closed doors, jason? >> they're not going to negotiate behind closed doors because nothing gets done. what you see right now with the republican proposal on monday, it was similar to what the democrats were offering in 2010. and john boehner is under a tremendous amount of pressure to look tough. they want to beat their chests and say we
to stay. >> thank you very much. what's next for the fiscal cliff debate? republicans are furious and president obama drawing a red line over middle class taxes. want to bring in steven moore with "the wall street journal." so, hello, sir. >> hi. >> let me show you, here is his new book on taxes and wealth in america. you wrote an opinion piece, steven, saying democrats only want one thing, higher taxes. you say democrats probably won't offer any serious spending cuts. why do you think that? there's no compromise in sight here? >> i just don't see it. you know, don, i was thinking a couple of weeks ago they would certainly reach an agreement, we wouldn't fall off the fiscal cliff, that people's taxes wouldn't go up in january. but now i'm not so certain about that. as you look at the negotiations so far and, look, my sources are on the republican side of the aisle, but what they're saying to me is this president doesn't want to deal from us, he want a surrender from us. so far what has been offered as jessica said has really been, you know, poison to the republicans. i'm not going
to avoid the fiscal cliff. but republican house speaker john boehner dismisses it as, and i'm quoting, la la land. the republicans offered their proposal, that happened about 24 hours ago. the white house quickly labels it as nothing new. business as usual, right? so how do we move beyond this stalemate in washington? we heard from the president, just a short time ago. our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin joins me now, jessica, the president spoke out, sat down in an interview with bloomberg tv, and in listening to the interview, did you hear any clues toward a possible compromise here? >> reporter: not new clues, brooke. the president laid down the marker that we heard from the white house consistently, which is they aren't moving until they hear the republicans agree to raise tax rates on the wealthiest. listen to what the president had to say. >> i think that, you know, we have the potential of getting a deal done, but it is going to require what i talked about during the campaign, which is a balanced responsible approach to deficit reduction that can help give businesses
will hurt our economy and will cost american jobs. republicans have taken action to avert the fiscal cliff by passing legislation to stop all the tax hikes. to replace the sequester, and pave way for -- pave the way for tax reform and entitlement reform. and we're the only ones with a balanced plan to protect the economy, protect american jobs, and protect the middle class from the fiscal cliff. but without spending cuts and entitlement reforms, it's going to be impossible to address our country's debt crisis. and get our economy going again and to create jobs. so right now, all eyes are on the white house. the country doesn't need a victory lap. it needs leadership. it's time for the president, congressional democrats, to tell the american people what spending cuts they're really willing to make. with that i'll take a few questions. >> speaker boehner, why will you not tell democrats what specific spending cuts you would like to see, especially within en titlements? >> it's been very clear over the last year-and-a-half, i've talked to the president about many of them. you can can look at
were to go over the fiscal cliff, they would be more effective in blaming it on republicans than vice versa. they feel like republicans know that. and they feel like they can kind of paint republicans in to this corner on income tax rates but as you know, as of right now, december 3rd and we have obviously a few weeks here before the fiscal cliff hits, as of right now neither side is budging and republicans are saying that they're not going to budge on those income tax rates but the white houses drawing a line over this. >> what do we know about plans for this week? i mean, apart from everybody spouting off hot air on talk shows do they have -- i'm sorry to be so crass but i'm getting a little annoyed by all the talk at us. >> reporter: yeah. >> instead of with each other. do they have any meetings planned? >> reporter: i'm not saying it's not an annoying process and i think americans feel exactly that way. there's no official meetings right now between the white house and congressional leaders. of course, there are meetings going on behind the scenes and contacts between the white ho
. >>> the fiscal cliff, the talks, trying to follow them requires some emotional flexibility. one day everyone's all, bipartisanship, let's make a deal. dems and republicans practically hugging and all that. by week's end, fiscal cliff talks were at a standstill. it was all doom and gloom and, they're not serious, what's wrong? we hate them again. let's bring in our body language expert, susan constantine, to help us. we want to start with house speaker, john boehner. he was saying on wednesday he was optimistic about a deal. >> republicans are committed to continuing to work with the president to come to an agreement to avert the so-called fiscal cliff. optimistic that we can continue to work together to avert this crisis and sooner rather than later. >> very next day, boehner is suddenly grim, talks having accomplished a thing. >> no substantive progress has been made in the talks between the white house and the house over the last two weeks. this is not a game. jobs are on the line. the american economy is on the line. and this is a moment for adult leadership. campaign-style rallies and le
like it. >> 29 days and counting until the u.s. could plunge off the fiscal cliff. this morning at least one republican is saying it's looking more like that's going to happen. after the plan laid out by the white house. >>> and she helped care for more than 140 children whose parents are behind bars in nepal. now she's got a new title. cnn hero of the year. cnn hero of the year. "newsroom" starting now. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good morning. thank you so much for joining me. i'm carol costello. concern this morning that a young woman's death will be overshadowed by fame. by now, even if you're not a football fan, you know the name jovan belcher. you know he killed the mother of his child and then committed suicide. but what do we know about his girlfriend? his partner? the mother of his child, kasandra perkins? according to the kansas city star perkins and belcher were madly in love but argued of late. the star added many people knew that belcher owned guns and enjoyed shooting but they'd never known him to be violent. not even close. nbc's bob costas on sunday
. >>> the fiscal cliff, less than a month away. if democrats and republicans don't reach an agreement, everybody's taxes will go up january 1st, and as emily schmidt reports, there's been a lot of talking on the sunday talk shows but not at the negotiating table. >> reporter: it's been 16 days since president obama and congressional leaders met to talk about how to avoid the fiscal cliff. the automatic spending cuts and tack increases that begin to kick in if there's no agreement by january 1st. 16 days to get here. >> i think we're far apart still, but i think we're moving closer together. >> i would say we're nowhere, period. we're nowhere. >> reporter: thursday treasury secretary timothy geithner proposed president obama's plan which included $1.6 trillion in tax revenue coming largely from an expiration of bush era tax cuts for families who make more than $250,000 a year. geithner says that's a must. >> there's not going to be an agreement without rates going up. >> reporter: the administration's plan also included $50 billion in new stimulus spending. boehner says the entire proposal repres
increase on the rich but also will blame the republicans if we go over the fiscal cliff, and this gives, frankly, this gives the white house and this gives the obama administration much more bargaining leverage. >> well, the former treasury secretary has one thing to say but many other voices are a virtual kcacophony where wolf blitzer has to sit every day. >> in the short term the president has more leverage right now because if they do nothing, let's say they avoid any legislation between now and the end of the year, starting january 1st we go over that so-called fiscal cliff, tax rates go up not just for the rich but for the middle class, for everyone, all those cuts in domestic spending and naths security spending, they go into effect. people aren't going to be happy about that, and the president will be able to say, look, i begged them, i repeatedly said 98% of the american public, they wouldn't get a tax increase if we just took them out of the equation, let's pass legislation extending the bush tax cuts for everyone earning under $250,000 a year. they didn't do it. so, you know,
, a lot of news to get to on this monday. first, of course, talks over the fiscal cliff. they are going nowhere fast. democrats, they're basically telling republicans, hey, ball's in your court. we'll take you live to the white house for that. also, as the city grieves over an nfl player's tragic breaking point, new debates today about gun control and domestic violence. you'll hear both. but first, the u.s. has long believed syria has a huge stockpile of chemical weapons. now new concerns that chemical arsenal is on the move. secretary of state hillary clinton today issuing another stern warning against syria, using these weapons. the syrian foreign ministry quick to respond here saying it would not use chemical weapons against its people if it had any, but this announcement as turkey is sending warplanes to its border with syria after the syrian military bombed a nearby town of ras al-ain. you can hear that and see the smoke. this is the turkish side of the border. this is fueling more fears that more of syria's violence will spill into its neighbor to the north, being turkey. security
no real solution today and that pretty much sums up the fiscal cliff negotiations. i feel like a broken record. here we go again on the countdown. day 26. got another 24 hours closer to the edge of the fiscal cliff which is why we have our eyes on the white house press briefing. got a live picture ready for you so we don't miss anything. for what it's worth, president obama and house speaker boehner are talking. they had a nice telephone conversation. that's terrific. the first time in a week but apparently that's the headline. that's the editorial body. not much came out of it that we know of. sources say no real breakthrough. no formal negotiations. sessions are not scheduled. no back channel discussions taking place that anybody knows about at this time and as we wait for the white house briefing to begin, let's bring in wolf blitzer on this topic. there are a couple of polls that are very telling about how americans feel about congress and the president are behaving when it comes to the fiscal cliff. let me read some of these numbers for you. should obama compromise to get things do
as democrats and republicans dig in and ramp up the rhetoric on the fiscal cliff. house speaker john boehner and senate majority leader harry reid trading jabs before the cameras on capitol hill. >> going over the fiscal cliff is serious business. and i'm here seriously trying to resolve it. and i would hope the white house would get serious as well. >> speaker boehner made very clear at his press conference that he thinks the ball is in your court and the president's court. he says democrats have got to get series about spending cuts. where is the disconnect? >> i don't understand his brain so you should ask him. okay? >> reid making those comments to our own kate bolduan. i'm joined by dan lothian. dan, we're learning more about the white house plan to deal with the fiscal cliff. break it down for us. >> reporter: right. this is the plan that secretary -- treasury secretary timothy geithner took up to capitol hill yesterday. it calls for $1.6 trillion in tax increases over a ten-year period more than republicans had anticipated. in addition to that, $400 billion in spending cuts that will
! >>> president obama taking his fiscal cliff fight with republicans on the road now. you saw he was just finished speaking at a toy factory company. this is in suburban mrefl. he is shaking hands with folks, doing the rope line. he is pushing his plan to avoid the fiscal cliff. is he standing firm on raising taxes for the wealthiest americans. want to bring in our chief white house correspondent jessica yell toin give us a breakdown of exactly what he has put on the table here because we know that both sides, they start off strong. they start off with the best offer they got, the strongest offer they got, and clearly, the republicans not quite happy about it. what is he offering? >> it's sort of a starting position from the white house. what secretary geithner laid out when he was visiting capitol hill yesterday was the headline $1.6 trillion in new taxes as part of their overall vision to increase those taxes for people making $250,000 more, but that also includes some changes to how much people can deduct, closing loopholes. increasing taxes for dividends and capital gains and some other things
of what he sees as the solution to the fiscal cliff. so there is the cliff and there is the chasm and mr. obama, as you know, is standing very firm on the $1.6 trillion in tax hikes. he is offering $400 billion in cuts from the so-called entitlements but also wants to spend $50 billion on infrastructure. mr. boehner, on the other hand, is offering half -- half of what the president's number is on those taxes and not in what you'd say increases. more like closing of loopholes. he also wants much deeper cuts in entitlements and beyond. so we're watching both ends of pennsylvania avenue this hour. we've got dan lothian who is standing pat at the white house to figure out just exactly what the movements are every day. dana bash is on capitol hill. dan, let me start with you. we were just hearing from the president and we were cut off by a nasty satellite. let me talk about these business people and what exactly they can bring to the table because it seems as though he's soliciting them for advice. >> reporter: he is. but at the same time, you brought up a good point, that the president reall
on the fiscal cliff negotiations. he'll meet with congressional leaders this afternoon. republican representative tom cole. >> we have lots of leverage in this negotiation. nobody wants the spending cuts, particularly democrats on the domestic side to go places. this doesn't deal with that. we still have plenty of leverage in the negotiation. i actually think the american people, number one, should never be used as leverage in a negotiation. >> yesterday, president obama met with corporate ceos who said that a compromise is essential to avoiding the so-called fiscal cliff. here is ceo lloyd blankfein. >> reporter: if this were easy, we wouldn't be standing here having come fabs at the white house how to achieve it. it's going to be difficult. i think what we try to do is we try to get in as good a place as we possibly can. i would rather have more of the -- more of the taxes deferred to beyond the period where the economy is weak. >> well, maybe all of this is working. markets around the world are up today, a sign of confidence that a fiscal cliff deal just might be in the works. w
is pushing ahead with the fiscal cliff pr campaign. he is meeting with a middle class family in northern virginia, and the white house says the president is going to talk about his efforts to extend tax cuts for the middle class as part of this debt deal. well, some economists are predicting that the country will go into another recession if this debt deal is not reached. any deal that the lawmakers and white house come up with is also going to have a major impact, so joining us to talk a little bit about it, peter morrissey. he is a business professor at the university of maryland, and our own chief business xhnt ali velshi. you wrote something, an article here, predicting that these tax hikes, the spending cuts likely in the debt deal, could push unemployment, you believe, from 7.9% all the way to 10%. how so? >> well, simply it will cut spending in the economy. the wealthy will have less money to spend, but the government will likely be spending a lot less money as well because the republicans are going to want spending cuts. you combine, say, about $250 billion in spending and tax cu
, on avoiding going over the fiscal cliff. jess, what have you learned? >> reporter: well, you know, the news here today is that in a phone call yesterday between the president and speaker boehner, i'm told by ae person familiar with the call, that the president made clear to the speaker that for him there will be no deal on the fiscal cliff unless both sides agree to raise rates on the wealthiest. that means raise tax rates for top earners. the reason that this is news is because there's been discussion publicly that perhaps they could find a rev new agreement where it would just involve capping deductions or maybe they could get to revenue just through tax reform, and with this piece of detail from that phone call yesterday, it would seem that the democrats, the president personally, is drawing a line saying those other ways are not enough. his campaign message that the top earners have to pay more, he is sticking to that line many these negotiations. >> jess, do we know how the republicans responded to this red line? >> well, speaker boehner was frustrated, wrovl, and came out with -- in h
. and just as many around the world. but we get his point. >>> speaking of the fiscal cliff, we know what the parameters of a deal in congress will look like, right? on taxes, republicans give in to raise taxes on the wealthiest 2% and democrats will agree to rein in tax breaks, right? democrats are fighting hard to preserve the tax deduction for state and local taxes, that costs the federal budget more than $80 billion a year. why? because 7 of 8 states where taxpayers use the deductions that much are blue or democratic. new york, new jersey, pennsylvania, all blue with the highest state local -- state and local taxes taken out there and property taxes. the tax deductions on them benefit higher income taxpayers in states that consistently deliver for the democrats. i get the politics of this but democrats need to own up. they can't have their cake and eat it, too. in the end, we are all going to pay more or we are going to get less. if we're serious about the fiscal house in order. if demonstrates are serious about republicans to break with ideology and their party base, to vote for high
in their opinion, to avoid the fiscal cliff. i think you can file this one under the to be continued unfortunately. >>> bipartisan delegation of governors meeting with the president and congressional leaders at the white house to discuss how badly this fiscal cliff could affect them out there in those states who rely heavily on the feds and how automatic deficit reduction measures will hurt state budgets. federal aid is big, big, big to the states. federal grants make up a third of state revenue. at the table, utah's governor gary herbert, government falli number, governor walker, minnesota's governor mark dayton, and arkansas's mike beebe. what they said when they emerged from the meeting. >> we have ideas how we can save money, how we can be able to create more efficiencies and government and spending with some of the different demonstrations that we've done in our various states we plan on getting back to the president, vice president with our suggestions and ideas. >> none of us want to see taxes on middle class folks go up. and we think it would have a significantly negative impact on the eco
. as scheduled on january 1st. this is a so-called fiscal cliff. january 1st. our news makers representative jim clyburn of south carolina, number three democrat in the house of representatives and number one i'm sure to a lot of people. hello. how are you? >> hey, don. thank you so much for having me. >> thanks for coming on. is speaker boehner right, though? as the clock is ticking, ticking toward january 1st, the talks haven't progressed in two weeks. is he right? >> well, i don't know that i'm as disappointed as the speaker is right now. i understand some of his problem with this. but the fact of the matter is the american people ended elections on november 6th, voiced their approval of president obama's approach to this. over 3 million more people voted for him than voted for mr. romney. and then if you look at house democr democrats. only 201 of us got eelected. that means the rest were republicans. >> i understand that. >> but over 500,000 more votes than they got -- >> with all due respect, representative, we understand that the president won and you feel that democrats won. but is the s
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)